yakotta

jenna pinkham, twenty-one.
uc berkeley, california.

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deducecanoe:

maarnayeri:

Iraqi student Zeidoun Alkinani protesting the posession of ancient Iraqi artifacts by Germans at the Babylonian Ishtar Gate in the Pergamon Museum of Berlin.
Prior to World War I, German archaeologists excavated large numbers of ancient artifacts across what is today Iraq and shipped them to Germany as part of a larger phenomenon of cultural pillage by European archaeologists across the Middle East that continued for decades.
In 2002, Iraqi officials asked for the return of the Gate, to no avail. A year later, the U.S. invaded the country.
via The Ajam Media Collective

Nodding. I really do wish western museums would own up to how they got their shit and give it back, make some fair or temporary trade (give us this for x years and we will give you y western art/architecture on loan too), buy it, or do replicas.
Western museums did not come across most of their collections honestly, even if it was acquired hundreds of years ago and I wish white people would own that shit. Work with world museums to rotate and share, work to give back stolen property and make reparations, instead of playing finders keepers.

deducecanoe:

maarnayeri:

Iraqi student Zeidoun Alkinani protesting the posession of ancient Iraqi artifacts by Germans at the Babylonian Ishtar Gate in the Pergamon Museum of Berlin.

Prior to World War I, German archaeologists excavated large numbers of ancient artifacts across what is today Iraq and shipped them to Germany as part of a larger phenomenon of cultural pillage by European archaeologists across the Middle East that continued for decades.

In 2002, Iraqi officials asked for the return of the Gate, to no avail. A year later, the U.S. invaded the country.

via The Ajam Media Collective

Nodding. I really do wish western museums would own up to how they got their shit and give it back, make some fair or temporary trade (give us this for x years and we will give you y western art/architecture on loan too), buy it, or do replicas.

Western museums did not come across most of their collections honestly, even if it was acquired hundreds of years ago and I wish white people would own that shit. Work with world museums to rotate and share, work to give back stolen property and make reparations, instead of playing finders keepers.

(via takealookatyourlife)

thebicker:

aspiringdoctors:

anexperimentallife:

"Another reason we thought it was men all along… ‘[M]ale archaeologists were doing the work," Snow said, and it’s possible thathad something to do with it.’”

This is exciting both in its own right, and as an example of how science can be improved by elimination of patriarchal values that attribute works to one gender or another based on assumption, rather than evidence.

In other words, it is exciting to see that so many early artists were women, and equally exciting to see scientists breaking through conditioned patriarchal thinking in order to reach better conclusions.

(X)

Girl power.

The erasure of women’s roles in human history is tantamount to violence. To this day, men - prominent men - feel totally comfortable saying women just aren’t good artists or writers. Admitting women are good at something - as good as men! maybe better! - means admitting that men have had an undeserved level of access to success in that field.

Last week, a few news sources reported on a recent study that suggests women are generally better investors than men. I saw it posted on Facebook, and because I’m a masochist, I read the comments. To paraphrase the majority of comments left by men: “But ladies be shoppin! LOLLLL” Even when we’re proven, statistically, to be better at something, men feel the need to tear us down. (You can’t really prove with math that women artists are just as good as men, but with something that’s entirely numbers-based like investing, it’s a little easier.) And in the case of the story above, it’s just assumed that something culturally and historically significant was done by men. A fist bump across time and space to the cave ladies making art before it was cool.

(via whoreofthebabylon)

exhibition-ism:

Lee Price creates realistic oil paintings, that show women and food in their intimate and private settings. The pictures are self-portraits of her, getting excessive with food that is considered indulgent, forbidden, or comforting. Her works addresses the intersections of food with body image, addiction, and unabating desire.

via IGNANT 

(via gtfothinspo)

“My problem with this last, ultimate defense of the selfie is the assumption it needs defending at all. We have been depicting cool animals since the #LOLMAMMOTHS of the Chauvet Caves, yet pseudo-historians are not lining up around Greenpoint to place the cats of Instagram in a lustrous tradition of art. Likewise, I have not read twenty-eight minor essays defending Thanksgiving dinner pics as new Dutch-masterly still lifes. The face alone has launched a thousand think pieces. So now the question is not one of basic selfie-justification, but rather, why must a photo of my face be justified when a photo of my bookshelf is not?”

— finally wrote my thing on selfies, for Artforum, a week or so ago. All hail Kim K. (via myvisagewasted)

You have to justify a picture of your face because you’re not some dude painting a woman for male consumption.

(Source: snpsnpsnp, via myvisagewasted)

elizabeth-charae:

This morning I overheard a commercial on the radio for some kind of bodysculpt liposuction surgery. The sales pitch was based around “Make your body a work of art”
I felt sad that people actually believe that the only way their bodies are beautiful or “a work of art” is if they’re thin. As an artist myself, I felt appalled by this. How can anybody say that one’s body is more beautiful than another? We are all brought to this planet, made from our parents, or strangers, or whomever; these are our homes, the places we have to live in, and love, and deal with everyday. How could my size lead to me being anything less than a piece of art? Our size does not, and will not ever determine our beauty or worth. We are all beautiful, we have to remember this. 

elizabeth-charae:

This morning I overheard a commercial on the radio for some kind of bodysculpt liposuction surgery. The sales pitch was based around “Make your body a work of art”

I felt sad that people actually believe that the only way their bodies are beautiful or “a work of art” is if they’re thin. As an artist myself, I felt appalled by this. How can anybody say that one’s body is more beautiful than another? We are all brought to this planet, made from our parents, or strangers, or whomever; these are our homes, the places we have to live in, and love, and deal with everyday. How could my size lead to me being anything less than a piece of art? Our size does not, and will not ever determine our beauty or worth. We are all beautiful, we have to remember this. 

(Source: elizabum, via gtfothinspo)

sicosa:

~Warrior Queen~
HA IM FUCKING DONE
Anyway y’all, when I started this behemoth of a PSD file, I had this one idea. It was of a globe-trotting Nilotic warrior woman who defeated a shit load of armies and collected the armor and accessories of her conquered opponents. This is what came out! *u*
The reason that this damn thing took so long was because of all the layers I was using. My poor computer couldnt handle it and Im just so impatient. Fortunately, I found a way around that and it’s done so enjoy! 
I used my sister’s face as a reference. Roughly inspired by the aesthetic of the orientalist art movement.

sicosa:

~Warrior Queen~

HA IM FUCKING DONE

Anyway y’all, when I started this behemoth of a PSD file, I had this one idea. It was of a globe-trotting Nilotic warrior woman who defeated a shit load of armies and collected the armor and accessories of her conquered opponents. This is what came out! *u*

The reason that this damn thing took so long was because of all the layers I was using. My poor computer couldnt handle it and Im just so impatient. Fortunately, I found a way around that and it’s done so enjoy! 

I used my sister’s face as a reference. Roughly inspired by the aesthetic of the orientalist art movement.

(via gtfothinspo)

sbosma:

I did the poster artwork for Streetlight Manifesto’s next (and final) tour. They wanted something featuring a bunch of warriors at the end of their journey, and obviously, I was very happy to help them out with that. I got to combine some of my favorite tropes of 80’s fantasy (Grace Jones look-alike included) with some Final Fantasy with some D&D. 

WOAH SAM

I’ve been really focusing on limiting my pallet lately, since I am becoming more interested in letting my linework show through.

(via myvisagewasted)

5centsapound:

Ruth Cuthand: Dis-ease

For more than 30 years, Ruth Cuthand has been challenging mainstream perspectives on colonialism and the relationships between ‘settlers’ and Natives in a practice marked by political invective, humour, and a deliberate crudeness of style.

Ruth Cuthand’s Dis-ease series consists of large, seductive beaded circles with complex patterns supported on rich, black, velvety surfaces and framed under glass. These circles depict microscopic views of agents that have caused the devastation and loss of many of North America’s indigenous peoples—diseases and viruses such as Spanish flu, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. At the same time, these circles echo some of the forms seen in First Nations beaded medallions.

These Dis-ease pieces were no mere scientific “curiosities” hung on Truck’s wall; there was no mistaking Cuthand’s understanding of history, nor her scientific grasp of the subject matter. This knowledge is depicted in the forms themselves. The clearly defined labels on the glass prompt us to distance ourselves from the work, but the details in the beadwork draw us in, making us understand that what we see is from a First Nations way of knowing. Although Cuthand provides no indication of how many victims were afflicted by these agents, we can feel the gravity and significance of that loss.

via canadianart

 

(via seriouslyamerica)

medievalpoc:

image

image

Hans Memling

Seven Joys of the Virgin Altarpiece

Flanders (1480)

Oil on Wood, 89 x 180 cm.

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University