yakotta

jenna pinkham, twenty-one.
uc berkeley, california.

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Moving to Japan today! Getting on the plane in less than an hour. Suuuuuper nervous but really excited to!

http://myvisagewasted.tumblr.com/post/97571069672/alloromantics-i-swear-to-god-i-fucking-hate-those

myvisagewasted:

alloromantics i swear to god

i fucking hate those posts that are like “why brotp pairing when you can otp pairing?”

let me translate that for you: “why have friendship when you can have romance?” um maybe because a romantic relationship is not automatically superior to a platonic one like to…

invisiblelad:

blacksupervillain:

blacksupervillain:

hussieologist:

jcoleknowsbest:

hussieologist:

jcoleknowsbest:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

darvinasafo:

Darren Hunt of Utah

The murder of young Black Men by police continues.

oh for fucks SAKE

Y’all he was shot in the back…. HE WAS SHOT IN THE BACK…

http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/58409680-78/family-hunt-moss-police.html.csp

He was carrying a sword? This mf in my geography class carried a sword to class everyday and when I expressed my discomfort it was dismissed. But this brotha was shot in the back.

and it was a blunted sword.. couldn’t have cut anybody… but white people walking around with loaded rifles in target…

Exactly! This is evil.

Damn. Niggas can’t even cosplay anymore? I would love to see the cosplay community say something about this but that definitely won’t happen

Also: this paper is edited by a clown. It should’ve been in the first fucking paragraph that this dude was cosplaying. I’m reading this shit wondering why the fuck this negro is walking down the street with a sword and obvious answer is hidden almost at the en of the article.

This dude was cosplaying.

He was dressed up in a costume.

Should all black people just stay home on Halloween this year?

Friendly reminder that the police shot a black cosplayer in the back

I was going to post this article yesterday but …i just couldn’t. 

(via takealookatyourlife)

micdotcom:

19 #WhyIStayed tweets everyone needs to see

While many cheered the NFL’s move to (finally) punish Rice’s vicious behavior, too many media outlets immediately fell into a tired pattern of victim blaming. 

Writer Beverly Gooden had heard enough. “I was watching the responses to the TMZ on my timeline, and I noticed a trend. People were asking ‘why did she marry him?’ and ‘why didn’t she leave him,’” Gooden told Mic. “When I saw those tweets, my first reaction was shame. The same shame that I felt back when I was in a violent marriage. It’s a sort of guilt that would make me crawl into a shell and remain silent. But today, for a reason I can’t explain, I’d had enough. I knew I had an answer to everyone’s question of why victims of violence stay. I can’t speak for Janay Rice, I can only speak for me.”

Gooden decided to change the conversation. Follow micdotcom

(via gtfothinspo)

micdotcom:

1,200 aboriginal Canadian women have gone missing over the past 30 years. Hashtag asks #AmINext?

On Aug. 17, Winnipeg police pulled the body of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine out of the Red River near Alexander Docks.

The scope of the tragedy prompted Holly Jarret of Hamilton, Ont. — cousin to Loretta Saunders, an indigenous woman who was murdered in February at age 26 — to launch the #AmINext hashtag earlier this month.

So, what’s being done about it? | Follow micdotcom

(via lipstick-feminists)

NYPD Cops Arrest Mom Who Was Waiting For Family To Return From Restroom [TW: Racism, Ethnocentrism, White Privilege]

prettyboyshyflizzy:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Chaumtoli Huq was standing alone outside a Ruby Tuesday’s in Times Square in July when New York City police officers told her to move. She says she wasn’t in anyone’s way, she wasn’t blocking the sidewalk — she was just waiting for her husband and two young children, 6 and 10, to come outside after using the restroom. 

That’s when the cops arrested her.

DNAinfo, which first reported on the arrest, says Huq “said the officers pinned her against the wall, prompting her to say, ‘I can’t move, I can’t move.’”

Huq told The New Civil Rights Movement in an email conversation that police pushed her “against the wall of Ruby Tuesday, and I screamed ‘Help,’” as this image, taken by a bystander, shows.

arrest_yell_2.jpg

She says when the police arrested her they pulled her arm up, causing pain and scars. Another officer, Huq says, was squeezing her arm “so I had to walk bent over,” as this photo, taken by the same bystander, shows.

arrest1.jpg

"My shoe was gone. All in public as folks watched." It was "humiliating," Huq adds.

As it turns out, Chaumtoli Huq is a human rights attorney. She says she is on leave from her position as general counsel for NYC Public Advocate Letitia James. And she says she’s suing.

"When I was arrested," Huq tells The New Civil Rights Movement, "I was with my family, and we had left a rally for children in Palestine who were being injured, killed because of the conflict, and [were] heading to a picnic in Brooklyn."

"At that moment, I was a mom, a loving partner to my husband of 12 years, but I became in a second the arresting officer’s ‘prisoner.’ He said to me when he was searching my purse and took my identification and when I objected, that I was his prisoner and he could do whatever he wanted."

The New York Daily News reports that when Huq “said she was in pain, one of the officers, Ryan Lathrop, allegedly told her, ‘Shut your mouth.’ When he found out she had a different last name than her hubby, he told her ‘In America, wives take the names of their husbands.’”

She was held for nine hours after the officers falsely claimed she had refused instructions to move and had “flailed her arms and twisted her body” to make it hard for them to handcuff her, the suit says.

chaumtoli_huq.jpg

Huq, who is 42, says she is currently “on a fellowship to investigate labor conditions in Bangladesh after the collapse of Rana Plaza.” She says, “I think that as a mom [that] I can be reduced and humiliated and separated from my family is what impacts me most to this day. My son asked me: ‘Why did the officer arrest you?’”

Raising a boy of color, and knowing how youth of color are vulnerable to over-policing, made me think, this is not about me but about my life’s work of protecting New Yorkers.

If at this moment, I didn’t step up and advocate for their rights, then, how can I authentically call myself an advocate for New Yorker.

As for the lawsuit, Huq says, “I am demanding in my suit and through community groups: (1) the officer to be removed; (2) training for NYPD on Muslim and South Asia community as well as gender: (3) change in city policy on over-policing in communities of color; (4) resources for youth of color who are most vulnerable to over-policing and whose life chances are most impacted by a criminal record.”

Source: David Badash for The New Civil Rights Movement

so when them body cameras coming in…

(via seriouslyamerica)

“In the 1890s, when Freud was in the dawn of his career, he was struck by how many of his female patients were revealing childhood [sexual] victimization to him. Freud concluded that child sexual abuse was one of the major causes of emotional disturbances in adult women and wrote a brilliant and humane paper called “The Aetiology of Hysteria.” However, rather than receiving acclaim from his colleagues for his ground-breaking insights, Freud met with scorn. He was ridiculed for believing that men of excellent reputation (most of his patients came from upstanding homes) could be perpetrators of incest.
Within a few years, Freud buckled under this heavy pressure and recanted his conclusions. In their place he proposed the “Oedipus complex,” which became the foundation of modern psychology… Freud used this construct to conclude that the episodes of abuse his clients had revealed to him had never taken place; they were simply fantasies of events the women had wished for… This construct started a hundred-year history in the mental health field of blaming victims for the abuse perpetrated on them and outright discrediting of women’s and children’s reports of mistreatment by men.”

― Lundy Bancroft

(via proletarianprincess)

read this carve it into your brains permanently etch it into your skulls r e a d  t h i s

(via miss-mizi)

NEVER.
FORGET.

(via feministbatwoman)

This is why I hate Freud. This man literally traded in his integrity and the wellbeing of his (female) clients for fame and fortune. 

(via hoodbunnies)

(Source: womensliberationfront, via gtfothinspo)

shatteredchrystal:

runaon:

a-little-bi-furious:

asherehsa:

samjoonyuh:

Perspective. 

"Looting? I thought these were supposed to be nonviolent protests"

I know it’s incredible! People are literally coming out of the woodwork to comment on this photoset to focus on the looting headline with “well yes it is nice they were helping people hit with the tear gas, but stealing is still wrong uwu” as if they’re back to kindergarten morality.

Like everyone who’s gone to boot camp I’ve been tear gassed. They put about 50+ of you in a gas chamber and toss it in. You have to stay there until your rank is allowed to exit. Before that though, you have to say your name, rank, and social security number. You then exit and file into ranks (again) outside and are not allowed at any point to rinse your face or eyes for the entire day.

That right there? Easily the worst part of boot camp. My eyes were literally swollen shut. I was blinded for a good 30 minutes and my chest hurt for days.

I have zero problem and not and ounce of judgement for people raiding a mcdonalds that can easily afford to repair damage for ANYTHING to help ease the shittiness that is being tear gassed. Esp because every one of us in boot were medically sound to deal with tear gas. Children, asthmatics, people prone to panic and anxiety attacks, the elderly as sooo many more are NOT going to handle tear gas well at ALL.

Or that smoke the police use either.

It’s easy to sit there and judge someone from the safety of your home and say things like “it’s just tear gas” or “it can’t be that bad”.

Fuck you. As someone who HAS been gassed, you need to stfu.

I remember all the preparation they did to get us ready for the gas chamber in boot camp. We were taught how to handle ourselves, how to control our breathing, not to touch anything, how to avoid the worst of the gas. But it still didn’t matter. I remember taking in that first breath and feeling like I had just been kicked in the chest. I remember a few guys in my platoon falling down and vomiting. We knew the gas wasn’t as bad on the floor but we were the fifth platoon through and the vomit kept us from bending over more than absolutely necessary. I remember a few guys, guys in peak health training to be infantrymen, breaking ranks and running for the door only to be dragged back in kicking and screaming until they said name, rank and serial. They were expecting it, trained for it, bragging about how it wouldn’t bother them.
I remember standing there with all of the mucus from my nasal cavity on the front of my ACUs and thinking to myself “This is the nonviolent option?”
Covered head to toe and my skin still itching I looked down at the silver wedding band hanging next to my dog tags and realized that the gas had eaten little pits into its surface.
I stood there and thought of all the news reports I had seen over the years. The uprisings and revolutionaries being gassed, the crowds running from men in masks.
That’s the moment I got it, staring at my ruined wedding band, that’s the moment I realized terrorism isn’t about bombs or who is using them. It’s about controlling people through fear. It’s about removing their ability to act reasonably, to make them seem like the monsters. Terrorism is about triggering people to fight or flight then blaming them for not being rational. It’s about power. Remove someone’s power to act with reason, and you remove their humanity.

(via seriouslyamerica)

“I don’t think the comment “bisexuals have straight privilege unless they’re in lesbian relationships” makes any more sense than saying “lesbians have straight privilege while they’re single”. This makes the assumption that all bisexuals who are single or in opposite-sex relationships actively hide their sexual orientation.

If a gay woman keeps her sexual identity secret while she’s single in order to avoid discrimination, we don’t accuse her of co-opting straight privilege – we sympathize with her for feeling the need to closet herself. So why the double standard for bisexuals?

It might not apply to you, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t straight-looking femme lesbians, or androgynous-looking, rainbow-wearing, alternative-haircut-having bisexuals. My point is that that comment oversimplifies and overgeneralizes things in a way that seems unreasonable to me.”

Chandra on Autostraddle (via my-drop-is-full-of-tree-branches)

(Source: socialjusticearcher, via takealookatyourlife)